YOU Can Heal Yourself in Mind and Body

Louise Hay was and still is right — YOU can do this

Regina Clarke

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Flowers in a field in sunlight
JL G

Your body is a natural healer. A cut on the arm magically closes and reforms and your skin shows no lingering sign of it. A headache can be erased in a second. The pain of a twisted ankle is removed and mobility restored with a half hour of speaking to the body and asking for its help and resting, certain the answer is forthcoming, and the healing already begun. Indeed, much of the physical pain you feel for any reason can be removed by your thought and request even before the injury or condition is resolved. Left to itself, your body can heal many conditions we tend to believe require a doctor’s attention, when our own innate wisdom is able to do a much better job of it.

We have always had this knowledge and wisdom about self-healing. For millennia. Our body has been our connection to the earth we walk on and that nurtures us. Our mind gives each of us innate knowledge of what our body needs and the earth grows it and makes it freely available.

Doctors are a relatively new invention, but they made sure very quickly that the old ways of herbalism and salves and potions and amulets and rituals of healing — and the power of spiritual faith — were denigrated and dismissed. One of the ways they managed this successfully was to ensure women who practiced the old ways were branded as witches and evil doers. The same applied to medicine men and women in indigenous cultures. Doctors became the primary — read that as “acceptable” — agent for curing patients.

Only that isn’t what they did. Most of the time, they frightened people into believing only they, professional physicians, had the right answers, the right treatment. They were the patriarchs of medical practice. It was science — and patriarchy — over health and well-being. In an astonishingly short time they made whole populations dependent on them for every ailment.

Our ability to heal ourselves was not only ignored but ridiculed. We — a bit like lemmings to the sea — followed their pronouncements and bowed before their authority.

We still do this today.

But we don’t have to.

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Regina Clarke

Storyteller and dreamer. I write about the English language, being human, the magic of life, and metaphysics. Ph.D. in English Literature. www.regina-clarke.com